Python 3.7 now available in Fedora

On February 28th 2018, the second beta of Python 3.7 was released. This new version contains lots of fixes and, notably, several new features available for everyone to test. The pre-release of Python 3.7 is available not only in Fedora Rawhide… Continue Reading →

GNOME 3.28 released & coming to Fedora 28

Last week, The GNOME project announced the release of GNOME 3.28.

Update on the Meltdown & Spectre vulnerabilities

January saw the annoucement of a series of critical vulnerabilities called Spectre and Meltdown. The nature of these issues meant the solutions were complex and required fixing delicate code.

Critical Firefox vulnerability fixed in 59.0.1

On Friday, Mozilla issued a security advisory for Firefox, the default web browser in Fedora. This advisory centered around two CVEs — both of which allowed an out of bounds memory write while processing Vorbis audio data, leading to arbitrary… Continue Reading →

Fedora Podcast 003 — Fedora Modularity

Episode 003 of the Fedora Podcast is now available. In Episode 003 features developer and software architect Langdon White from the Fedora Modularity team. Langdon also leads the Fedora Modularity objective. Langdon is a passionate technical leader with a proven… Continue Reading →

3 security videos from 2018

The recent conference in Brno, Czechia is an annual event run by and for open source developers and enthusiasts. Hundreds of speakers showed off countless technologies and features advancing the state of open source in Linux and far beyond. A perennially… Continue Reading →

Continuous integration in Fedora

Continuous Integration (CI) is the process of running tests for every change made to a project, integrated as if this were the new deliverable. If done consistently, it means that software is always ready to be released. CI is a very… Continue Reading →

Improve your Python projects with mypy

The mypy utility is a static type checker for Python. It combines the benefits of dynamic typing and static typing. As you may know, the Python programming language is dynamically typed. So what does static type checking for Python mean?… Continue Reading →

Install Flathub apps on Fedora

Flathub is a third party repository of applications that are packaged in the Flatpak format. Many Flathub apps are also in the main Fedora repositories, but in some cases it ships newer and in-development versions of these apps. Additionally, Flathub… Continue Reading →

Fedora Podcast 002 — Ambassadors, the face of Fedora

The Fedora Marketing Team is continuing with the Fedora Podcast and we have a new episode out. This ongoing series will feature interviews and talks with people who make the Fedora community awesome. These folks work on new technologies found… Continue Reading →

3 Ansible videos from 2018

The recent conference in Brno, Czechia is a great example of an event by and for developers and open source community members. Hundreds of speakers showed off countless technologies and features advancing the state of open source in Linux and far… Continue Reading →

How to add fonts to Fedora

Fonts help you express your thoughts in creative ways through design. Whether you’re captioning an image, building a presentation, or designing a greeting or advertisement, fonts can boost your idea to the next level. It’s easy to fall in love… Continue Reading →

Meet the supplemental wallpapers in Fedora 28

The release of Fedora 28 is growing closer, and now you can see the supplemental wallpaper for the upcoming release. The Fedora Design team works with the community to supplement the standard wallpaper for each release. For this release there… Continue Reading →

4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can… Continue Reading →

Oxidizing Fedora: Try Rust and its applications today

In recent years, it has become increasingly important to develop software that minimizes security vulnerabilities. Memory management bugs are a common cause of these vulnerabilities. To that end, the Mozilla community has spent the last several years building the Rust… Continue Reading →

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